Project Portfolio

Dan Maynes Aminzade

Research

Actuated Workbench
Audience Interaction
Hover
You're in Control
Edible User Interfaces
Fuzzmail
KC-135
OSCAR

Schools

Stanford
MIT
Carnegie Mellon

Industry

MERL
Microsoft
Adobe
Disney Imagineering

Fun

Unsafe Search
Music Visualization
Mobot
PantsCam
Taboo Database
Pointillism
Painting
WebAmp

Zany

Tacos
SETI Joke
Pepsi Database
Love Calculator

Hacks

AdBall
RCA Lyra
Stone Cold

Humor

SURG Proposals
Female Pop Singers
Satan Baby
Wesley Willis

Pointillism

Pointillism is a style of painting that was popular among the French Neo-Impressionists of the late 19th century.  It involves the practice of applying small strokes or dots of contrasting pigment to a surface so that from a distance the dots blend together into solid forms.

In a sense, this is what a computer does every time it draws an image using colored pixels.  But because pixels are so small, computer monitors don't give us that gentle Neo-Impressionist feel.

After admiring the paintings of Seruat and Pissarro, and inspired by this clever painting tool, I decided that I would try to design an image processing filter that lent computer pictures a pointillist quality.


Detail from "Entrée du port de Honfleur"
by Georges Seurat.  Oil on canvas, 54 x 65 cm.

The filter simply samples random pixels from the image buffer and draws them at a larger size over the original image until a new image is formed.  The results are reasonably good: the picture on the right is a computer-generated pointillist self-portrait.

One of the computers in my lab has a video capture card, so I wrote a program that grabs frames from the card and processes them on the fly.  The result is a weird sort of pointillist movie, the likes of which I've never seen before.  Perhaps I'll submit a clip to the student film festival.


I'm no Monet, but I can BitBlt like nobody's business.


Four frames demonstrating the pointillization process.